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Watch the ALL NEW "MasterCandidate" on TalentTV!

It doesn't take a rocket scientist to realise that rocking up in a tee-shirt and jandals (I exaggerate for media effect) and knowing diddley-squat about the company wouldn't stand you in good stead to sweep the job from the other 500 applicants.

I've written about this before, but feel it's time to bring it up again

There are many programmes on television about property, food, and managing out of control kids. At the moment we're inundated with them. Yet there has been very few that focus on jobs and careers. The funny thing is that without a job or career, you're likely to lose your house, you'll struggle to eat, and because of how you feel, your kids will be even more out of control! A job is the foundation of society, and the foundation of family and people's greatest investment, yet there is little recognition of the importance of this aspect of life other than if you haven't got one!

I was a bit heartened recently with the advent of a series called "Would like to Work" but this "heartening" was rather short lived because it was a rather shallow execution of a very important component of life. For a start it was hosted by a "foreigner" and whilst I have no doubt as to his skills, it cast a flavour of "colonialism" on the programme. And the participants were clearly in a desperate position and at a level that wasn't too difficult to define where the problems lay. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to realise that rocking up in a tee-shirt and jandals (I exaggerate for media effect) and knowing diddley-squat about the company wouldn't stand you in good stead to sweep the job from the other 500 applicants. I'm delighted they got the job, but in the end we knew they would anyhow otherwise the episode would not have shown! There were some useful snippets in the show, but in the end it was "theatre" or "television" rather than being at all useful. But then I suppose entertainment is what television is about, not information.

The small component that was addressed did not do justice for what needs to go into changing jobs or careers, especially at the professional and executive end of the market. And this is an area that is not that well served, other than by companies that step in once the axe has fallen. In typical fashion, we in New Zealand box on regardless and rarely evaluating that what we're doing is really what we want to do, or are best at doing. "Back of the envelope" stats say that up to 70% of those in jobs would change if they could. It's quite frightening really!

So let me address another small part of a small component of job hunting - the CV. We should not assume that because someone is very good at what they do at a senior level, that they are good at "selling themselves". In my nearly 30 years in this business, I've seen some pretty atrocious CV's come in from very senior people, not just in content, but in layout. And whilst on this, the adage of "less is more" does not apply to changing your career. A "2 pager" for a senior level role is a nonsense, and anyone who tells you that is how you should do it, doesn't know what they are talking about. You need enough detail to sell yourself (tweaked for the specific role) and support your application (relevant information and detail for that role) in a meaningful and targeted way.

But it goes way beyond that. Every aspect of your application needs to be viewed beyond the actual event. For example a CV with errors and spelling mistakes (attention to detail and carelessness - haven't you heard of spellcheck?), or technology failing when applying for a role (Using Explorer 4 on the home computer - how tech savvy are you really?), whilst appearing minor, may be perceived as a symptom of a bigger problem.

There's a lot that needs addressing before the CV and lots and lots after the presentation of this document. It would be useful if there was more emphasis in this area in the mainstream media. I'm not talking about "histrionics and entertainment" but more about tying useful information that will assist people in the quest for their desired.

So I look forward to the launch of "MasterCandidate" where people create new "recipes" for their career success!

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